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One Of The Most Critical, And Often Forgotten, Aspects Of House Moving

One Of The Most Critical, And Often Forgotten, Aspects of House Moving

Buying or selling any Greenwich home is, on one hand, a highly technical matter.  The full complement of Connecticut rules guarantee that the transaction cannot be challenged and the volumes of paperwork executed at the closing table speak to sealing the deal.

But there’s also the human aspect that follows a property closing.  And that is saying goodbye to the house itself.  Sound funny? As someone who has moved her family more times than you want to know, I can attest to the importance of marking this passage appropriately.  It is often a moment that’s overlooked until it’s on top of you.  And then the moment has passed; in the rearview mirror; gone forever.  In fact, a couple of simple preparations can contribute to a proper closure:

Be a Historian.  Once our family decides to move forward, I take the time to write an account of our care and experiences during the time the home was in our stewardship.  This includes talking about any renovation or actual work that we undertook, including facts and information that future owners wouldn’t know or couldn’t find.  I also share any stories of important moments or events held at the house, and what the house was like for us as we lived there.  I also put aside a box for house memories– photos, momentos, and such.  Since our family loves pre-war homes, I take a small “something” from each house we have lived in.  One was a pair of original sconces, another was the timeclock that the night watchman punched as he walked around the property “back in the day.”

Share With Your Local Historical Society.  The account that I write can be altered appropriately for sharing with the historical society and the future homeowners.  As chairperson of the Greenwich Historical Society’s Landmark Recognition Program, I know how precious documentation by homeowners is.

Bring the House with You.  Even before your moving day arrives, make sure you take photographs of the elements of the house and grounds that can stand for all time.

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